Tree Public Consultation

//Tree Public Consultation

Tree Public Consultation

Three independent surveys have resulted in the same conclusion.   We have to take the Chestnut and the Lime trees down.   We will know more about the London Plane when the work starts the week of 16th November.   

From our mini-polls we see that you would like the trunks to remain, but it’s a neck and neck race for whether we have a wildlife sanctuary or a sculpture, with an edge for turning the Chestnut into a sculpture.  We will confer with the Garden Designer on what will work best and let you know here. 

Our next quest is to find out which trees you would like to see as replacements.  

So tell us in our new poll. Vote here: https://www.menti.com/dsery7yhi4 and view the results below.

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Strawberry Tree Arbutus Uneda

Common Crabapple Malus Sylvestris

Common Hawthorn Crataegus Monogyna

English Oak Quercus Robur

Hazel Corylus Avellana

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A survey to check the condition of the trees and undertake any necessary action was carried out by an independent contractor of the OPW on 29 September 2020.  The full results of this survey are published below.

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The key advice is that unfortunately the large Chestnut tree in the photo above has an infection and displays on the two main scaffold boughs.  These exhibit excessive crust formations which girdle and compromise tree soundness and tree structure stability.  The recommendation is therefore that the tree is removed to maintain health and safety requirements in this public space. 

Before we do this, scheduled for the second week of November, we want to get your opinion on the following:

  1.  the removal of the trees so the community can use the garden, 
  2.  what creative, environmentally friendly things we can do with the tree remains 

 

 

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Click the links to access our Press Release and the Tree Survey Report 

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2020-11-12T16:57:49+00:00
 

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Anne Ryan
Anne Ryan
10th November 2020 3:14 pm

The trees at the hunt museum should be treated if possible , remove branches, treat the tree itself these trees give us so much so leave the trees

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Hunt Museum
Hunt Museum
Reply to  Anne Ryan
12th November 2020 8:30 am

Dear Anne, We are definitely with you on this and this is the aim of the OPW who are responsible for these trees.

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John Galvin
John Galvin
9th November 2020 1:23 pm

It seems to me to be a very depressing confluence of events. Remove the railings around the Hunt Museum -which seemed a wonderful idea – and then immediately remove three ‘dangerous’ trees. Obviously nobody wants anyone to be injured but the term ‘Health and Safety’ seems to render all discussion null and void – and the decision seems to have already been made. Was it considered to rail the sick tree off instead (as has been done in Britain) to allow it to die on its feet? Also, why if one tree is sick and presenting as a ‘danger’ are… Read more »

Hunt Museum
Hunt Museum
Reply to  John Galvin
12th November 2020 8:28 am

Hello John, Yes you are right. We are very upset about the tree survey results as the very last thing we would want to do is remove any mature tree.

The small Lime is the second tree that needs to be removed because of its damage to the building structures. We think it might have self-seeded and are looking at moving it rather than chopping it.

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Tanya Slattery
Tanya Slattery
8th November 2020 11:38 pm

Obviously health and safety has to come first but just make sure that a bat survey is done of the trees and that the trees are removed outside of the breeding bird season. Old, rotten trees are great for bats. Maybe put up some bat boxes to replace any lost roosts?

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Adam
Adam
8th November 2020 11:00 pm

If a tree has a disease it’s understandable that it may not be viable – all /most horse chestnuts have this though. It seems that any survey conducted will result in the surveyor recommending removal of trees / pruning of crown to justify their job. Pruning of crown in particular makes the tree look unnatural .

I’m not sure what this consultation is about . If the decision has already been made ? A exercise in PR?

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Hunt Museum
Hunt Museum
Reply to  Adam
12th November 2020 8:22 am

Hi Adam, We agree with everything that you say, so have tried to find other solutions. We have now had 3 separate consultants, including someone who came forward with the express intention of helping to find ways to save the trees. And the conclusion for the Chestnut is the same from each expert. We are going to leave a large part of the trunk in place, so as to keep the structure of the soil and a wildlife habitat and we have asked the OPW to replace it with as large a tree as possible.

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Kieran
Kieran
4th November 2020 2:15 pm

Stop cutting down trees in every possible situation. It’s more trees we need, not less. Flooding will continue to be a problem where there are no trees to absorb water from the soil. Wet soil with less trees will make the ground soft, causing remaining trees to uproot in storms. Trees also absorb a significant amount of the carbon which fills our city from cars etc. Set the example.

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Hunt Museum
Hunt Museum
Reply to  Kieran
6th November 2020 8:43 am

Totally agree – we will replace the trees and are looking to grow saplings for planting from the conkers that the dying Chestnut is shedding, hoping to get school children in involved in a plant 10 trees for each one we need to remove.

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Jennifer Sheehan
Jennifer Sheehan
3rd November 2020 4:57 pm

I’d hope the trees would be replaced with 2 native Irish trees instead

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Hunt Museum
Hunt Museum
Reply to  Jennifer Sheehan
6th November 2020 8:41 am

Yes we will be asking everyone which ones they would like shortly

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Peter Long
Peter Long
3rd November 2020 4:45 pm

Consider having a tree sculpture like Will Fogarty did in St. Mary’s Cathedral and Scoil Ide rather than cutting down and digging up roots.

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Milly
Milly
30th October 2020 5:18 pm

So sad to loose the trees, but think if we can replace them it is definitely better that the garden is a safe place and we can all use it!

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